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Where does the good go

African-American-line of Al Sharpton’s speech

African-American-line of Al Sharpton’s speech
 
Lawyers are constantly drafting and re-drafting briefs, memos and motions. Most times it’s for very minor changes: appellant is misspelled, there are two commas, we put the wrong name plaintiff name in the caption, and so on. But since these documents can be voluminous, attorneys often will “black-line” one draft against another in order to quickly highlight the changes for a reader. I was told that Al Sharpton significantly diverged from his prepared remarks to deliver the most fiery speech of the convention. Lawyer that I am trained to be, I thought I would blackline the differences. Deleted text in Red. Text added at delivery in Blue. (Of course.)

Prepared remarks

This is not about a party. It is about living up to the promise of America.
The promise of America says that we will guarantee quality education for all children, and not spend more for metal detectors than computers in our schools.
The promise of America guarantees health care for all of its citizens, and does not force seniors to travel to Canada to buy prescription drugs they cannot afford here.
The promise of America provides that those who work in our health care system can afford to be hospitalized in the very beds that they clean everyday.
The promise of America is government that does not seek to regulate your behavior in the bedroom but to guarantee your right to provide food in the kitchen.
The promise of America is that we stand for human rights – whether it’s fighting slavery in Sudan, AIDS in Lesotho, or police brutality in this country. 
The promise of America is one immigration policy for all who seek to enter our shores, whether they come from Mexico, Haiti, or Canada.
The promise of America is that every citizen’s vote is counted and protected, and election schemes do not decide elections.
I often hear the Republican party preach about family values, but I can tell them something about family values. Family values don’t just exist for those with two-car garages and retirement plans. Family values exist in homes with only one parent in the household making a way against the odds.
I stand here tonight, the product of a single parent home, from the depths of Brooklyn, New York. My mother was a domestic worker who scrubbed floors in other people’s homes for me. And because she scrubbed those floors, I was proud to stand as a presidential candidate.
Those are family values.

 
 
SKIP TO :

This is not about a party. This is about living up to the promise of America. The promise of America says we will guarantee quality education for all children and not spend more money on metal detectors than computers in our schools.
The promise of America guarantees health care for all of its citizens and doesn’t force seniors to travel to Canada to buy prescription drugs they can’t afford here at home.
We did it with a go-it-alone foreign policy based on flawed intelligence. We were told that we were going to Iraq because there were weapons of mass destruction. We’ve lost hundreds of soldiers. We’ve spent $200 billion dollars at a time when we had record state deficits. And when it became clear that there were no weapons, they changed the premise for the war and said: No, we went because of other reasons.
If I told you tonight, Let’s leave the Fleet Center, we’re in danger, and when you get outside, you ask me, Reverend Al, What is the danger? and I say, It don’t matter. We just needed some fresh air, I have misled you and we were misled.
We are also faced with the prospect of in the next four years that two or more of the Supreme Court Justice seats will become available. This year we celebrated the anniversary of Brown v. the Board of Education.
The promise of America provides that those who work in our health care system can afford to be hospitalized in the very beds they clean up every day.
The promise of America is that government does not seek to regulate your behavior in the bedroom, but to guarantee your right to provide food in the kitchen.
The issue of government is not to determine who may sleep together in the bedroom, it’s to help those that might not be eating in the kitchen.
The promise of America that we stand for human rights, whether it’s fighting against slavery in the Sudan, where right now Joe Madison and others are fasting, around what is going on in the Sudan; AIDS in Lesotho; a police misconduct in this country.
The promise of America is one immigration policy for all who seek to enter our shores, whether they come from Mexico, Haiti or Canada, there must be one set of rules for everybody.
We cannot welcome those to come and then try and act as though any culture will not be respected or treated inferior. We cannot look at the Latino community and preach one language. No one gave them an English test before they sent them to Iraq to fight for America.
The promise of America is that every citizen vote is counted and protected, and election schemes do not decide the election.
It, to me, is a glaring contradiction that we would fight, and rightfully so, to get the right to vote for the people in the capital of Iraq in Baghdad, but still don’t give the federal right to vote for the people in the capital of the United States, in Washington, D.C.
Mr. President, as I close, Mr. President, I heard you say Friday that you had questions for voters, particularly African- American voters. And you asked the question: Did the Democratic Party take us for granted? Well, I have raised questions. But let me answer your question.
You said the Republican Party was the party of Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. It is true that Mr. Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, after which there was a commitment to give 40 acres and a mule.
That’s where the argument, to this day, of reparations starts. We never got the 40 acres. We went all the way to Herbert Hoover, and we never got the 40 acres.
We didn’t get the mule. So we decided we’d ride this donkey as far as it would take us.
Mr. President, you said would we have more leverage if both parties got our votes, but we didn’t come this far playing political games. It was those that earned our vote that got our vote. We got the Civil Rights Act under a Democrat. We got the Voting Rights Act under a Democrat. We got the right to organize under Democrats.
Mr. President, the reason we are fighting so hard, the reason we took Florida so seriously, is our right to vote wasn’t gained because of our age. Our vote was soaked in the blood of martyrs, soaked in the blood of good men (inaudible) soaked in the blood of four little girls in Birmingham. This vote is sacred to us.
This vote can’t be bargained away.
This vote can’t be given away.
Mr. President, in all due respect, Mr. President, read my lips: Our vote is not for sale.

  Al  in red vs. Al in blue.

Pretty impressive on the fly editing if you ask me, although the inversion of Barack Obama’s name – ooh, dare I say chiastic (no, I daren’t) praise of Obama Barack might be stinging this morning.  
Ok, enough of my proscratinating.

3 Responses to “African-American-line of Al Sharpton’s speech”

  1. kaz Says:

    wowza. i didn’t realize there was that much of a departure. see? we’ve learned useful skills…

  2. iocaste Says:

    OMG, Dawn, Jon Stewart just did the most hilarious segment where he ripped the pundits a new one because they all reacted poorly to Sharpton’s speech. Best moment was where Stewart showed white middle-aged Howard Fineman of Newsweek speculating that black voters would be insulted at the prominence given to Sharpton. Anyway, sooner or later a clip will probably show up here. Or, look for reruns.

  3. Hi there Says:

    Are you there?

    Well … again a nice post .

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