Clareified

Those days are gone forever; I should just let 'em go but…

Archive for July, 2004

He Makes It Sound Like a Bad Thing

Saturday, July 31st, 2004 by Dawn Summers

He Makes It Sound Like a Bad Thing

Go take Mithras’ telling quiz about the Republican party.

THE WHITE MAN’S J-LO

Saturday, July 31st, 2004 by Dawn Summers

THE WHITE MAN’S J-LO

Nic Cage married for third time.

UNTIL NEXT YEAR

Saturday, July 31st, 2004 by Dawn Summers

UNTIL NEXT YEAR

Confirming, once again, that all good things must end, my birthday season is officially over. As in year’s past, I planned just enough celebrations, ate enough birthday bake goods and drank more than enough birthday libations, to make me sigh with relief that it’s over.
Last night’s East coast close-out was awesome. (yes, it wasn’t enough that I had parties on land, in the air and on the water — this year I made it a bi-coastal affair.) Friends from law school and college, friends from Old and New LLP, and many of my new band of bloggers all converged on Kanvas to share my special season with me surrounded by mysterious New York street scenes.
The evening billed as the night of 29 Cosmos, was actually the night of 11 Cosmos (actually, the official blogger of the event had four Cosmos, plus my friends from college had two, so perhaps there were 29 collective Cosmos consumed after all…) I’ve written about my high tolerance for alcohol before, but last night’s marathon session produced mixed results.
While I couldn’t figure out the square root of 169, I could figure out the square root of 144.
While there was no pinching of the bottoms of any bouncers, there was an unusually high amount of hugging.
While I was able to offer a ride to a friend’s engagement party, I don’t now remember to whom.
While I was able to warmly greet all my guests, there were a few moments when I thought I had dreamed that someone came, only to be startled by seeing them sitting in a booth IRL.
While I was able to hail a cab and give clear, coherent directions to my home, I fell asleep after making the first turn onto the highway.
Finally, while I did wake at the end of that ride covered in my own vomit, I was able to launder and dry all my clothes that very night.
Thanks to “Mark,”(and candace for being there in spirit,) Lisa (all-white table notwithstanding) :), Jessica, Yaron, Ari, Oschisms, Scott (congratulations on getting credentials!), Alceste, Peter and Asphnxma for coming.
Thanks too, to Karol for covering the party. (I am choosing to ignore all insults about my outfit and any aspersions cast on my sobriety.)

YES, HE IS

Friday, July 30th, 2004 by Dawn Summers

YES, HE IS

Now, put those away before you hurt someone.

Thanks to Rdan for the link.

REMEMBER, IT’S PRONOUNCED: LIE-LEKS

Friday, July 30th, 2004 by Dawn Summers

REMEMBER, IT’S PRONOUNCED: LIE-LEKS
 
Ah! The Gulf of Tonkin incident and subsequent resolution made it seem as if they had. So he fell for that, as everyone did. He voted to wage war against Iraq because he fell for that, as everyone did. He’s learned. Next time he needs hard proof, like a smoking crater in New York.
 
Make that another smoking crater in New York.

 
War against Iraq. Crater in New York.  Who said there was a connection? He put a period between them and a hard return. God, what more do you liberals want? 

(As usual, Lileks suckered me in with another adorable Gnatecdote:

It’s Gnat’s fourth birthday Friday. I’m in Merlin mode: as she gets older I feel younger. I can’t imagine what my life would be like without her – I’d just be kicking the sawdust, measuring my life by the piles of magazines I take out to be recycled every other week. She saved my life; giving her every Barbie in the world is the least I can do.

But then made me pay for continuing the read. Sigh)

And, I, Sir, accept your acceptance

Friday, July 30th, 2004 by Dawn Summers

And, I, Sir, accept your acceptance
 
I’ve never been a fan of the using the word “service” to describe holding political office.
I spent two semesters “serving” my classmates in the Yale dining hall. What Presidents, Senators and congresspeople do, doesn’t even come close.
I want my elected officials to work: work for me, my city, my state and my country.
Last night, as I watched John Kerry wipe the sweat from his brow mid-way through the best acceptance speech given in my lifetime, I knew that he would be a President who worked. And, (go chiastic) he worked as President.
The tone for me was set when Lt. Jim Rassman said “nobody asked me to join this campaign…I volunteered.” The look of anger and hurt in his eyes, framed by the resolve of his face and stoic stance, made my eyes well up to think that people would attack him to try to gain a political advantage over a candidate. (For the record, I am certain that Kerry’s rivals to the Democratic nomination engaged in it, so this isn’t a Republican critique. That will come later.) The line of men standing behind him on the stage, Senator Cleland’s moving tale of how he lay, struggling to get up from the street in front of the White House — it all made me appreciate that John Kerry’s service in Vietnam isn’t just a punchline or a photo op; it matters.
Certainly, it’s not the most important thing or the winning argument. If my family in the military or my friends who have recently enlisted are shot in Afghanistan or taken hostage in Iraq, I can’t imagine that I would ask to see their wounds or the calculate length of their capture to measure the worth of their sacrifice. Snide remarks about “scratches” and cracks about “four-months” are unconscionable. Jessica Lynch spent less than a month in Iraq and when she encountered enemy fire, spent most of the battle on her knees crying and praying. But I challenge anyone to belittle her contribution, mock her service. 
In that moment when John Kerry stepped up to the podium and said he was reporting for duty, the contrast between him and his opponent was pointedly clear. And Kerry didn’t miss a step for the next 46 minutes.
Not once did I look a my watch, not once did I wince or cover my ears begging him to stop talking. And when he was done I couldn’t remember Clinton’s speech or Obama or even Edwards. Indeed, I couldn’t imagine any one else standing on that stage ready to face Bush in November.
Kerry is not a compromise candidate, the guy who’ll do — he’s the best of the Democratic party and (fingers crossed) America will see that he’s the best our country’s got.
Kerry’s a man that knows that “warfare” isn’t rolling back tax cuts on the wealthiest 2 percent in order to pay for armor for our soldiers or for benefits for seniors and the poor. He knows “warfare,” with all due respect Mary Matalin, is young people holding weapons in foreign lands as they march through uncertain dangers — not ending corporate welfare for companies that pay their CEOs 7 figures, while shipping jobs overseas to save a buck or two an hour in wages for the people who do the real work.
Contrast the image of Bush chopping up trees, with Kerry’s “cathedrals of nature.” Bush’s bible-thumping “God is on our side,” with Kerry’s humble prayer that he may be on God’s side. Kerry’s bold “what if” vision of using the Federal Government’s spending power and the bully pulpit of the Presidency to find cures for autoimmune diseases that are killing Americans in the millions, with Bush’s use of the White House to inject discrimination into the Constitution and increase government controls on civil liberties.
I can’t recall ever rooting for Kerry before, but last night he became the obvious choice for President.  His speech was that good (Although, his line about us all being American “red, white and blue,” did prompt a reflexive “Why it gotta be white!”).
This morning I watched the pundits interview Republicans and their rebuttals were flimsy.
“But…but, he’s made himself over” and ”where are the specifics?” Putting aside the humor of the the party of vague warnings and redacted documents, now clamoring for details and specifics, I thought Kerry did a great job of laying out his plans: cutting waste, fighting a smarter, more effective war and re-engaging in diplomacy.  I love that John Kerry understands that law and order, starts with law. His vision doesn’t include cutting and pasting the protections of the Constitution as he sees fit; it’s too important a cornerstone to our democracy.
That Kerry was the “most liberal member of the Senate for 20 years,” ummm, ok Paul Wellstone and/or Russ Feingold may have a thing or two to say about that (ok, Wellstone, not so much), but hey, I’m ok with that. As Kerry said in his speech, he also worked with the most conservative member of the Senate, John McCain and that tells me, he can possibly bring this country together again.
I realized why Kerry seemed so stilted during the primaries. He is not made for spewing catchphrases and slogans; the worst part of last night was the “Hope is on the way” chanting. He is a leader, a major player, not — a cheerleader. Many say that George Bush found his voice on the rubble of the Twin Towers; there his presidency was born.  I disagree, I simply saw a man who knows a thing or two about shouting through a megaphone.  
Last night, I saw a President.
Kerry may not beat Bush, but hopefully he’ll run again in 2008. I think he was born for (and in, I guess) the West Wing. I’ll be working to help him acheive that.
I don’t know, somewhere in the process of falling in line, I fell in love. 

African-American-line of Al Sharpton’s speech

Thursday, July 29th, 2004 by Dawn Summers

African-American-line of Al Sharpton’s speech
 
Lawyers are constantly drafting and re-drafting briefs, memos and motions. Most times it’s for very minor changes: appellant is misspelled, there are two commas, we put the wrong name plaintiff name in the caption, and so on. But since these documents can be voluminous, attorneys often will “black-line” one draft against another in order to quickly highlight the changes for a reader. I was told that Al Sharpton significantly diverged from his prepared remarks to deliver the most fiery speech of the convention. Lawyer that I am trained to be, I thought I would blackline the differences. Deleted text in Red. Text added at delivery in Blue. (Of course.)

Prepared remarks

This is not about a party. It is about living up to the promise of America.
The promise of America says that we will guarantee quality education for all children, and not spend more for metal detectors than computers in our schools.
The promise of America guarantees health care for all of its citizens, and does not force seniors to travel to Canada to buy prescription drugs they cannot afford here.
The promise of America provides that those who work in our health care system can afford to be hospitalized in the very beds that they clean everyday.
The promise of America is government that does not seek to regulate your behavior in the bedroom but to guarantee your right to provide food in the kitchen.
The promise of America is that we stand for human rights – whether it’s fighting slavery in Sudan, AIDS in Lesotho, or police brutality in this country. 
The promise of America is one immigration policy for all who seek to enter our shores, whether they come from Mexico, Haiti, or Canada.
The promise of America is that every citizen’s vote is counted and protected, and election schemes do not decide elections.
I often hear the Republican party preach about family values, but I can tell them something about family values. Family values don’t just exist for those with two-car garages and retirement plans. Family values exist in homes with only one parent in the household making a way against the odds.
I stand here tonight, the product of a single parent home, from the depths of Brooklyn, New York. My mother was a domestic worker who scrubbed floors in other people’s homes for me. And because she scrubbed those floors, I was proud to stand as a presidential candidate.
Those are family values.

 
 
SKIP TO :

This is not about a party. This is about living up to the promise of America. The promise of America says we will guarantee quality education for all children and not spend more money on metal detectors than computers in our schools.
The promise of America guarantees health care for all of its citizens and doesn’t force seniors to travel to Canada to buy prescription drugs they can’t afford here at home.
We did it with a go-it-alone foreign policy based on flawed intelligence. We were told that we were going to Iraq because there were weapons of mass destruction. We’ve lost hundreds of soldiers. We’ve spent $200 billion dollars at a time when we had record state deficits. And when it became clear that there were no weapons, they changed the premise for the war and said: No, we went because of other reasons.
If I told you tonight, Let’s leave the Fleet Center, we’re in danger, and when you get outside, you ask me, Reverend Al, What is the danger? and I say, It don’t matter. We just needed some fresh air, I have misled you and we were misled.
We are also faced with the prospect of in the next four years that two or more of the Supreme Court Justice seats will become available. This year we celebrated the anniversary of Brown v. the Board of Education.
The promise of America provides that those who work in our health care system can afford to be hospitalized in the very beds they clean up every day.
The promise of America is that government does not seek to regulate your behavior in the bedroom, but to guarantee your right to provide food in the kitchen.
The issue of government is not to determine who may sleep together in the bedroom, it’s to help those that might not be eating in the kitchen.
The promise of America that we stand for human rights, whether it’s fighting against slavery in the Sudan, where right now Joe Madison and others are fasting, around what is going on in the Sudan; AIDS in Lesotho; a police misconduct in this country.
The promise of America is one immigration policy for all who seek to enter our shores, whether they come from Mexico, Haiti or Canada, there must be one set of rules for everybody.
We cannot welcome those to come and then try and act as though any culture will not be respected or treated inferior. We cannot look at the Latino community and preach one language. No one gave them an English test before they sent them to Iraq to fight for America.
The promise of America is that every citizen vote is counted and protected, and election schemes do not decide the election.
It, to me, is a glaring contradiction that we would fight, and rightfully so, to get the right to vote for the people in the capital of Iraq in Baghdad, but still don’t give the federal right to vote for the people in the capital of the United States, in Washington, D.C.
Mr. President, as I close, Mr. President, I heard you say Friday that you had questions for voters, particularly African- American voters. And you asked the question: Did the Democratic Party take us for granted? Well, I have raised questions. But let me answer your question.
You said the Republican Party was the party of Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. It is true that Mr. Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, after which there was a commitment to give 40 acres and a mule.
That’s where the argument, to this day, of reparations starts. We never got the 40 acres. We went all the way to Herbert Hoover, and we never got the 40 acres.
We didn’t get the mule. So we decided we’d ride this donkey as far as it would take us.
Mr. President, you said would we have more leverage if both parties got our votes, but we didn’t come this far playing political games. It was those that earned our vote that got our vote. We got the Civil Rights Act under a Democrat. We got the Voting Rights Act under a Democrat. We got the right to organize under Democrats.
Mr. President, the reason we are fighting so hard, the reason we took Florida so seriously, is our right to vote wasn’t gained because of our age. Our vote was soaked in the blood of martyrs, soaked in the blood of good men (inaudible) soaked in the blood of four little girls in Birmingham. This vote is sacred to us.
This vote can’t be bargained away.
This vote can’t be given away.
Mr. President, in all due respect, Mr. President, read my lips: Our vote is not for sale.

  Al  in red vs. Al in blue.

Pretty impressive on the fly editing if you ask me, although the inversion of Barack Obama’s name – ooh, dare I say chiastic (no, I daren’t) praise of Obama Barack might be stinging this morning.  
Ok, enough of my proscratinating.

CLAREIFIED’S NEW MASCOT

Thursday, July 29th, 2004 by Dawn Summers

CLAREIFIED’S NEW MASCOT

“Hopey”

SHOWDOWN

Thursday, July 29th, 2004 by Dawn Summers

SHOWDOWN
 
Moore will be at the Republican National Convention!

Karol will be at the Republican National Convention.

Do they sell umbrellas in MSG?

PAY US, PAL

Thursday, July 29th, 2004 by Dawn Summers

PAY US, PAL
 
Paypal has entered a settlement agreement which may entitle you to some funds.
 
Monetary Relief Under the settlement, PayPal will pay $9.25 million into a settlement fund, to be held in an interest-bearing account. The fund will be used (1) to make payments to class members who submit valid claims before the claims deadline; (2) to pay certain costs of giving notice to the Class and of settlement administration, as approved by the Court; and (3) to pay attorneys’ fees and expenses to Class Counsel in the amount awarded by the Court. Class Counsel have proposed that, after deduction of notice and administrative costs and Class Counsel’s attorneys’ fees and expenses, the balance of the fund (“Net Settlement Fund”) be applied in accordance with a written plan of allocation. (The following explanation is qualified in its entirety by reference to the Plan of Allocation attached to the Settlement Agreement as Exhibit C, a copy of which is on file with the Court and available on the Internet at https://www.paypal.com/settlement/.)
 
Check it out if you opened a Paypal account between October 1994 and January 2004.*

UPDATE

Iocaste has more.

 
* Does not qualify as legal advice in any way. In fact, nothing on this site should be construed or considered advice of any kind. Do not try this at home. For external use only. Caution. Achtung. Falling Rocks.